Vietnam Statistics and Myths

Go to: http://uswings.com…t-us-wings/vietnam-war-facts

 

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Intrepid 75th Anniversary UPDATE

– Our allotment of 170 rooms at the hotel sold out.
– Expecting more than 300 FCM to attend
– Expecting more than 1,000 for dinner on INTREPID Thursday night
– Expecting 500 – 700  for the dinner cruise on Saturday.
– This will be my last Reunion due to health.
It has been an honor and privilege to serve our
USS Intrepid Former Crewmember Association
Ralph Slane
Former Crewmember
Association Reunion Activities Co-ordinator & Benefactor
Past Member
New York Council
Navy League of the U.S.

Lynn Bari, ‘PinUp’

Lynn Bari Lynn Bari was one of 14 young women “launched on the                 trail of film stardom” August 6, 1935, when they each received a six-month contract with 20th Century Fox after spending 18 months in the company’s training school. The contracts included a studio option for renewal for as long as seven years.

In most of her early films, Bari had uncredited parts usually playing receptionists or chorus girls. She struggled to find starring roles in films, but accepted any work she could get. Rare leading roles included China Girl (1942), Hello, Frisco, Hello (1943), and The Spiritualist (1948). In B movies, Lynn was usually cast as a villainess, notably Shock and Nocturne (both 1946). An exception was The Bridge of San Luis Rey  (1944). During WWII, according to a survey taken of GIs, Bari was the second-most popular pinup girl after the much better-known Betty Grable.

Bari’s film career fizzled out in the early 1950s as she was approaching her 40th birthday, although she continued to work at a more limited pace over the next two decades, now playing matronly characters rather than temptresses. She portrayed the mother of a suicidal teenager in a 1951 drama, On the Loose, plus a number of supporting parts.

Bari’s last film appearance was as the mother of rebellious teenager Patty McCormack in The Young Runaways (1968) and her final TV appearances were in episodes of The Girl From U.N.C.L.E. and The FBI.

She quickly took up the rising medium of television during the ’50s, which began when she starred in the live television sitcom Detective’s Wife, which ran during the summer of 1950, and in Boss Lady

In 1955, Bari appeared in the episode “The Beautiful Miss X” of Rod Cameron’s syndicated crime drama City Detective. In 1960, she played female bandit Belle Starr in the debut episode “Perilous Passage” of the NBC western series Overland Trail starring William Bendix and Doug McClure and with fellow guest star Robert J. Wilke as Cole Younger.

From July–September 1952, Bari starred in her own situation comedy, Boss Lady, a summer replacement for NBC’s Fireside Theater. She portrayed Gwen F. Allen, the beautiful top executive of a construction firm. Not the least of her troubles in the role was being able to hire a general manager who did not fall in love with her.

Commenting on her “other woman” roles, Bari once said, “I seem to be a woman always with a gun in her purse. I’m terrified of guns. I go from one set to the other shooting people and stealing husbands!

Ref: THE INTREPID newsletter, Volume 3, Number 4, October 1945 and the Internet

Two Typhoons From Okinawa

In the Fall of 1945, the INTREPID was in Buckner Bay at Okinawa and the weather was hot and calm. There were several other vessels in the same enclosed body of water. Most of the aircraft were on the hanger deck and it seemed like a very quite day. Suddenly, we were given an alarm of an approaching typhoon with waves as high as 70 feet. Everyone scrambled to secure all movable items on the flight and hanger decks. It seemed like in a few minutes the flight deck was vacant and the steel doors were downed locked on the hanger deck. The crew was ordered to stay below decks as the ship raced to get out of the Bay opening into the Ocean.

Shortly, we did clear the island by about a half mile when the first wave was visible on the horizon. It appeared as a wide white line at a distance. As it rolled toward us, we slowed down to meet the first wave which stopped the Intrepid while it lifted us upward and shuck everything violently. Water went over the flight deck. This was a serious storm. Within a few minutes the waves increased in height to 90 feet. The ship headed into the waves at an angle to reduce the impact of head-on collisions. The forward speed was about 4 knots to maintain steerage. When a wave was under the hull at mid-ship, the bow and stern would bow down and the expansion plates on the flight deck would cover wide gaps. We would “crash” into a new wave every few seconds and everything on the ship would shake and make noises. This continued for three days.

We were lucky the ship did not fail that test. We felt like we were comparable to a “bar of Ivory soap in an old fashion washing machine”.  The control tower was subject to wave splashes  20-to 30 feet high.

After three days, we returned to Buckner Bay to “take inventory and observe damages”. We resumed destroying floating mines in the seas around Japan for another ten days before we were given another “typhoon alert”. This time we responded quicker…got out of the Bay in shorter time and knew more about what to expect. The second was about the same as the first one, but it ended after 2.5 days. Fortunately, we saw no more rough water until December.

That is when we boarded 2000 paratroopers as guests to ride from Japan to San Francisco for Christmas leaves. On the eleven day trip we had seven days of heavy seas and hundreds of sea sick paratrooper. “What happened on that trip… stay on the ship”!!!

Story contributed by AOM3/c Keith Butterfield